Monty's Pass

Horses | Last ran in 2005
Dam - Friars Pass
Sire - Montelimar
Dam's Sire - Monksfield

Monty's Pass Grand National Wins

  • 2003 - ridden by Barry Geraghty trained by James Joseph Mangan

A three-time runner in the Grand National, winning the race once and landing a bit of a touch for punters, which may be why the 2003 race sticks in the mind of some people. Backed from 40/1 on the morning of the race down to a winning SP of 16/1, many will remember backing Monty’s Pass to victory under Barry Geraghty.

Foaled on April 23, 1993, Monty’s Pass took his owners on some great days out, including big victories such as the Grand National. Trained by small Irish handler James Joseph Mangan, his career, and in particular, victory in the Grand National, was one to give all small owners and trainers hope that they too could join the big boys from time to time.

After winning the race, Monty’s Pass would return for another two attempts, and he ran very well a year later when finishing fourth, while he rounded things off in the Grand National with a 16th placed finish in 2005.

Full Results

Year Result Prize Money Handicap Jockey Trainer
2005 16 - 11-6 Barry Geraghty James Joseph Mangan
2004 4 £30,000 11-10 Barry Geraghty James Joseph Mangan
2003 1 £348,000 10-7 Barry Geraghty James Joseph Mangan

Winner of the 2003 Grand National

When pundits were discussing the 2003 Grand National before the race, many had it labelled as being one of the highest quality races we had seen for a number of years. There was a lot of expectation on the race, and it certainly didn’t disappoint when it came to the result.

With a 7/1 favourite, the betting market was wide open, although it was a gamble a little further down the list that caught the punters’ eye on the day. Things began months before, with Racing Post Pricewise putting the horse up as a bet for the race at 40/1. He opened at 40/1 on the morning of the race, but with support from many newspaper tipsters, which were highly trusted by many at the time, the money began to be placed on Monty’s Pass.

He was sent off with an SP of 16/1, showing just how many of the general public went with the tipsters who were talking highly of his chances on the day, and they were rewarded for that. With two fences to go, four horses remained in contention, but that quickly went down to two, and then it was here where Monty’s Pass showed his supreme stamina to win the race.

There was no stopping the winner, who came away in great style and recorded a winning distance of 12 lengths. As others faded away and felt the distance of the race take its toll, Monty’s Pass actually relished it and went even better.

This was the kind of impressive performance that labelled Monty’s Pass as a horse that could potentially come back and retain his crown. He tried a year later and ran well to finish fourth, while he would also return in 2005 but couldn’t get involved.

Thanks to the gamble on the day, punters will remember the win by Monty’s Pass, and his excellent performance to storm clear on the run-in is one certainly worth the praise he received.

Monty’s Pass’ Early Years

Monty’s Pass began life on the amateur scene running in hunter chase races. He had five races in that sphere, winning one of them, and a year later, he was onto the professional scene under rules. Interestingly, after proving his jumping, he went straight into novice chase races rather than the traditional national hunt, flat races or hurdles.

With a handful of wins along the way, Monty’s Pass slowly raised his handicap mark and, in turn, the quality of races he was running in. To begin with, he was running over much shorter too, with few races at 3m or further, so he did well to win as many races as he did.

When moving into his older years, though, and going up in trip, this is when Monty’s Pass really came to life, and he excelled in racing.

Monty’s Pass’ Big Race Wins

Of the eight races that Monty’s Pass won in total, he gave his owners two big days out. The first came in September 2002, with a win over three miles in the Kerry National at Listowel.  He stayed on very strongly, showing that races further than three miles would be within his reach.

While this was the second biggest day out the horse had, it was a big day because after winning this contest, connections really believed that the Grand National dream was alive. He was trained for the race straight after, running over hurdles to protect his handicap mark, which was done well.

Then came the biggest day of his career, winning the 2003 Grand National. For a small yard and owners, the big day was extraordinary, showing they could challenge bigger names in the racing world, and they deserved every second of their success.

Many punters will remember it, too, the big newspaper gamble on the morning that was landed by Monty’s Pass.